Victorious Blog, Episode 7: Season Finale


“Who is the greatest chicken killer in Shakespeare?” “Macbeth, because he did murder most foul.”

This is the seventh post of the Victorious Blog series. Click here to read the series.

Well, folks: It’s the end of an era. The glorious reign of Victoria on Masterpiece is over …  for now.

Our Sunday evenings will no longer include these lovable new pals – from Queen Victoria to Prince Ernest. Over the course of the season, even the characters we initially cursed under our breath warmed our hearts eventually (I’m looking at you, uncle Leopold!).

At this point, it feels like it’s been years since we gazed upon Lord M.

It’s been a lovely journey.

But it’s not over yet! The good news: Victoria is returning to Masterpiece next year for a second season. And in a definite win for the series, it was recently announced that Dame Diana Rigg (most recently of Game of Thrones) is joining the cast

The second season, with creator and executive producer Daisy Goodwin remaining at the helm (love those strong women leaders!), sees Queen Victoria face the new challenge of motherhood. Jenna Coleman reprises her role of Queen Victoria alongside Tom Hughes as Prince Albert.

WPT will shout Season 2 premiere dates from the rooftops as soon as we know.

Until then, I’ll relish the memories of the Victoria finale. “Young England” offered new morsels that will keep our mouths watering for more Victoria, but also tied up some loose ends. Of course, I need more Victoria ASAP, but my heart isn’t aching over a huge bombshell or abrupt ending.

In no particular order, here are my three favorite things about the finale:

1. Baby = character development

I enjoyed the character development that occurs throughout Victoria’s pregnancy. Pregnancy amplifies the aspects of Victoria’s personality we already know: she’s independent, stubborn and strong. She doesn’t stay in bed and play it safe, despite the never-ending (and very real) threat of childbirth actually killing her. She doesn’t enjoy being pregnant and isn’t going to pretend she does. She is repulsed by the idea of nursing.

Victoria: “I want you to find me a wet nurse immediately.”
Lehzen: “So you will not be following your mother’s example?”
Victoria: “She is not a Queen, and I am not a cow.”

While Victoria’s personality grows even stronger, everyone else seems to find their softer sides. Uncle Leopold and Victoria share a (literally) sweet moment, which makes me forget how frustrating he was while trying to play matchmaker.

For Lehzen, her undying loyalty to Victoria becomes even more apparent; the poor woman is a nervous wreck 24/7 over the possibility of Victoria not making it through childbirth.

When the baby girl is born, even Mr. Serious Albert falls head over heels. And he wants to name the baby Victoria. See what he did there?

Meanwhile, everyone is ecstatic that Cumberland doesn’t get to live out his evil plot. PHEW. Thanks, baby Vicky!

“Did you really think I’d let Cumberland be King?” –Victoria


2. Being Queen is a dangerous business

Think being Queen is all chocolate-eating and train-riding? Think again. This episode showed the dark side of royal life.

Besides all of that dangerous baby business, there’s a violet-tossing stalker trying to “rescue” Queen Victoria from her “German tyrant” of a husband.

And, oh yes – assassins.

Victoria insists on carriage rides to greet her people because she’s not one to sit at home and wait out the storm. No, ma’am. But one of these jaunts leads to someone actually trying to assassinate the Queen. Everyone freaks out because there seems to be some sort of familial Hanover link… only to learn that the man is unrelated and mentally ill.

The attempt portrayed on screen is historically accurate; it was only the first of many assassination attempts the Queen endured. This first attempt was carried out by an 18-year-old Londoner named Edward Oxford, and Victoria was so shaken up after the fact that Lord M. paid her a visit.

(But not on the show. That was a real bummer, Daisy Goodwin.)

3. A little romance for the road

There’s a long, Victoria-free road ahead of us, but we were graciously given a little romance trail mix to hold us over.

Ernest is back! AND he’s been holding the Duchess’ handkerchief this whole time!

Okay, he probably let it go at some point …

Even though it’s a complicated relationship that will never go smoothly, I have a soft spot for Ernest and his honesty. I was happy to have him return.

Ernest: “Did you miss me?”
Duchess: “I suppose there were moments when I pondered the whereabouts of my handkerchief.

Oh, these two. The pair shared some taboo romantic moments that involved piano playing (a given!) and Ernest said some ridiculously romantic things. “I don’t think anymore, I just feel.” Le sigh.

Ernest and Albert squabble after Ernest is seen leaving the Duchess’ room, with Ernest playing the old “You don’t understand me!” card.

Yes, love is complicated. At least Ernest got a lock of her hair.

 

Meanwhile, belowstairs, Miss Skerrett’s advice from a friend leads her to turn down Francatelli’s romantic offer to run away and start a new life.

Obviously, though, she’s overcome with regret once he leaves without her. Nothing says regret like sobbing in an alley.

It will be interesting to see if the two reconnect in Season 2 …

Okay, okay – I know I listed three favorite things already, but just one more: Victoria’s “We are not amused” line. Interested in the history behind the line? I was, too. Here’s a cool article that offers some insight.

I’ve loved spending each week recapping the series with all of you – thank you for watching and thank you for reading. Long live Queen Victoria on PBS!

3 thoughts on “Victorious Blog, Episode 7: Season Finale”

  1. Well, Boo! Hiss! I missed the last episode. I looked all over for it on Feb. 26, but evidently it was moved to March 5, and I didn’t even look for it then.

  2. Does anyone know the name of the song Ernest was singing while the Duchess was playing the piano in this…the season 1 finale?

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